Health in Roseburg, OR

Feeling some distress while living with cancer is normal. But when distress affects your ability to cope with the disease, its treatment, and your daily life, it’s time to ask for help.

Life after cancer is emotionally challenging. Oncology social worker Hester Hill Schnipper, LICSW, OSW-C, describes 5 signs of distress and how you can find help.

Tumor markers are substances found at higher than normal levels in the blood, urine, or body tissue of some people with cancer. Although cancer cells often produce tumor markers, healthy cells in the body may produce them as well. Tumor markers are also called biomarkers.Tumor markers and cancerHigh tumor marker levels can be a sign of cancer. Along with other tests, tumor marker tests can help doctors diagnose cancer and plan treatment. Tumor markers are most commonly used to do the following: